summer scholars page banner

All of our Summer Scholars courses have moved online! All of the courses will follow a virtual format and take place during the original dates and times.

Summer Programs

Summer Scholars

Our Summer Scholars Camp Preps Your Child for Fall

Our coeducational summer program offers students entering grades 6-12 opportunities to preview or review:

  • Business
  • English
  • History
  • Math
  • Politics
  • Science
  • And so much more!

Taught by Oak Knoll faculty, these courses are an extension of an Oak Knoll academic experience. Our strong and well-rounded college preparatory program meets the highest standards, and our students consistently score well above the national average on standardized tests. In light of COVID-19, all of our Summer Scholars sessions will be taught online. Please review the detailed course descriptions for registration information. All courses are open to the public.

Online Courses

Title: Algebra I and Some Fun!
Teacher: Mr. Cardell
Dates: June 22 to July 23, 2020
Monday-Thursday
Time: 8:30-11:30 a.m.
Grades: Students entering grades 7-9 (Prerequisite – Pre-Algebra)
Format: Online
Tuition: $800
Register here.
This class gives students a solid preview of high school algebra I. The course will review the concept of variables (studied in pre-algebra) and emphasize operations with variables. Students devote a major portion of the course studying topics such as graphing, solving equations and inequalities, factoring, exponents and radicals, rational expressions and linear systems. Each class begins with a thorough review of the previous homework assignment followed by the introduction of new material, individual instruction on problem worksheets and work at the board. Math games, critical-thinking problems and some fun projects involving teamwork are added to make the overall experience creative and bring mathematics to life. Students are expected to complete daily homework and classwork assignments without the stress of cumulative assessments. Extra help is available if needed. No text is required for this class; the course is based upon material gleaned from several different sources, with the Oak Knoll algebra I curriculum serving as the foundation. Lesson handouts and assignment sheets are provided on a daily basis, and students are required to keep this course material organized in a binder. At the completion of this course, students will be ready to succeed in their high school programs.“Mr. Cardell’s Algebra I camp was a great addition to my summer, as he combined learning math with fun games. I entered my eighth-grade year of math with ease, knowing that Mr. Cardell had prepared me for it over the summer.” T, grade 8This summer, an Oak Knoll rising senior will act as Mr. Cardell’s student intern. She will be available to work with him on lesson plans and to help with individual guided instruction.Lastly, students who take this course are eligible for extra math help during the school year. Mr. Cardell works in close coordination with the mathematics teachers, and tutors Algebra I, Algebra II, Geometry and segments of Pre-Calculus.

Title: Colonial and Post-Colonial Studies
Teacher: Mr. Petito
Dates: July 6 – August 6
Time: 1 hour, 4 days a week
Grades: 11-12
Format: Online
Register here
This course aims to engage the student in a dialogue on the inter-cultural encounters inevitable in the reading and analysis of world literature. The course is a journey to and through the thinking and life of “postcolonial subjects” as you hear and read the poems, and novels of colonial and post-colonial countries. This course will primarily use two fictional texts (Beasts of No Nation & Petals of Blood) to examine theoretical issues related to colonialism. Short stories of Hemingway and poems by Derrick Walcott will also be examined. There will be two short papers, weekly one-page discussion postings as well as a final research paper. Our discussions will examine critical theory as it relates to topics of race, sex, nationalism, identity, history, and gender within the texts. Weekly written discussion topics will center around one or more of the following topics:

  • Critique a text by isolating one or two points/ideas/images you find provocative for their postcolonial implications.
  • Explore one or two points/ideas/images from the text that relate (or do not relate) to your own lived experience.
  • Note parallels between texts.
  • Comment on a writer’s craft, the way s/he writes and how effective you find it.

Title: Current Events
Teacher: Mr. Ike Welsh
Dates: July 13-30, 2020
Time: 2 hours, 4 days a week
Grades: 9-12 (9:30-11:30 a.m.); 6-8 (12:30-2:30 p.m.)
Format: Online
Register here.
Description:
In a student-centered and conversational setting, students will examine the national and world headlines that unfold throughout the summer. Students will develop and refine the 21st century skills of critical thinking, collaboration, and communication. Reading with diligence, recognizing bias, linking historical connections, and exploring events from a variety of sources and viewpoints will be molded and encouraged as articles and topics are examined. Students will discuss and debate their own perspectives within an inviting conversational context – an experience that is sure to boost confidence as a new school year approaches. The Harkness Model, a highly engaging method for cultivating class conversation, will serve as the basis for student engagement and discussion. Students will be gently guided down the path of healthy and effective civil discourse – a worthy pursuit in our world today. Active listening, positive body language, respect for alternative views, clear articulation of viewpoints, confidence, presence, and poise are all elements of the Harkness model.
Supplies Needed: None

Title: Environmental Ethics
Teacher: Mr. Petito
Dates: June 29 – July 30
Time: 1 hour, 4 days a week
Grades: 11-12
Format: Online
Register here
How should human beings relate to the natural world? Do we have moral obligations toward non-human animals and other parts of nature? And what do we owe to other human beings, including future generations, with respect to the environment? We’ll examine these questions and others through the lens of different ethical theories. Using those theories, we’ll address topics like animal rights, environmental justice and pollution, climate change, environmental activism and the role technology can play in ameliorating and/or exacerbating environmental problems. Weekly written discussion topics will center around one or more of the aforementioned topics. There will be two short papers, weekly one-page discussion postings as well as a final research paper.

Title: Financial Literacy
Teacher: Ms. Liebau
Dates: June 22 to July 2, 2020
Time: 12:30-2 p.m.
Grades: 9-12
Format: Online
Register here.
Description:
This is a crash course in finance for high school students – topics including: how to budget, buying a house, buying and selling cars, insurance, financing college, being an informed consumer, what to do when in debt, and how to build credit and use credit cards.

Supplied Needed: None

Title: Geometry
Teacher: Suzanne Powers
Dates: June 22 to July 23, 2020
Time: 8:30-11:30 a.m.
Grades: Students entering grades 8-10
Format: Online
Tuition: $800
Register here.
Euclidean geometry is the basis for this course. The course begins with points, lines, planes and space – the building blocks of geometry. Students analyze congruency of triangles, polygons, the Pythagorean Theorem, similar polygons, circles, areas, parallel lines and volumes. Formal proofs are an emphasis throughout the course. Computer software complements selected topics. The enrichment course will give the student a solid preview of the high school geometry course. Students will be expected to complete daily homework assignments without the stress of cumulative assessments. At the completion of this course, a student will be ready to succeed in their high school program.
Book: Geometry – McDougal Littell Jurgensen, published by Great Source Education Group ISBN 0-395-97727-4

Title: Grammar Gateway
Teacher: Ms. Mangold
Dates: July 13-16, 2020
Time: 12:30-2 p.m.
Grades: 6, 7 and 9
Format: Online
Register here.
Description:
There are no pre-requisites for this course; only a willingness to improve writing. This course will focus on concepts that have been identified in recent years such as subject-predicate agreement, pronoun agreement, punctuation, and complex sentences. These structural concepts will enhance student writing. There will also be a creative writing component.
Supplies Needed: None

Title: Introduction to Physics
Teacher: Mr. Williams
Dates: August 17-21, 2020
Monday-Thursday
Time: Session 1: 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.; Session 2: 1-3 p.m.
Grades: Students entering grade 9
Format: Online
Tuition: $175/session
Register here.
Are you interested in understanding more about what ninth grade physics is all about? If so, this summer one-week preview class is for you! Dr. Regina Neiman, who teaches freshman physics courses at Oak Knoll, will run a one-week summer preview of what physics is, what to expect during the school year and what materials/resources are available for you to be successful in grade 9 physics. Come join us for some physics, fun lab activities and some math review to help prepare you for the fall.

Title: Introduction to Strength and Conditioning
Teacher: Ms. Maskery
Dates: July 13 – August 13
Time: 1 hour, 3 days a week
Grades: 9-12
Format: Online
Register here
Description:
In this course, we will cover basic fitness principles, cardiorespiratory endurance and flexibility, the importance of muscular strength, endurance, and power, and fitness assessment, design and implementation.
Through the five weeks of the course we will cover, briefly, essential anatomy to strength and conditioning. We will then move to the biomechanics that are involved in strength and conditioning. Once gaining a better understanding of the anatomy, students will learn the importance of an demonstrate techniques to improve cardiorespiratory endurance. Towards the end of the class, students will learn about proper exercise selection and how to create an exercise program.
Supplies Needed:
Internet connection

Title: Jane Austen Today
Teacher: Dr. McTague
Dates: June 22 to July 9, 2020
Time: 10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays
Grades: 10-12
Format: Online
Register here.
Description:
What is it about Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice that makes readers want to keep coming back for more? Do Austen novels provide such relevant commentary on marriage, power dynamics and gender roles not to mention attitudes toward wealth that Americans today keep trying to revisit them? This course will consider a few of the modern responses to Pride and Prejudice and Emma. Instead of studying the canonical novels themselves, we will focus on the modern works. Knowledge of the 19th century novels is by no means a pre-requisite for this course. Instead after a succinct introduction to the central conflicts and characters of the two novels, students will read Eligible by Curtis Sittenfeld and Jane Austen in Boca by Paula M. Cohen and write a critical response to one of these novels. Then we will view two films, Pride and Prejudice and Clueless and consider them critically.
Supplies Needed:
Eligible by Sittenfeld (ISBN 9780812980349)
Jane Austen in Boca by Cohen (ISBN 0312319754)

Title: Maps, Democracy and the Election of 2020
Teacher: Ms. Johnston
Dates: July 13-30, 2020
Time: 1 hour, 4 days a week
Grades: 9-12
Format: Online
Register here
With the 2020 Presidential election quickly approaching, this course will provide students the opportunity to learn about the Electoral College. Students will learn the reason our forefathers created this system, current questions about its validity, and alternative methods proposed to replace the electoral college. Using results from the 2012 and 2016 elections, students will research if election results would have changed if alternative methods of electing the president were used. The course will culminate with students making an educated prediction on the results of the 2020 election based on maps and statistics.
Students enrolled in this course should expect four to six hours of work per week. Most work can be completed according to the student’s personal schedule. A live one hour Zoom call will take place every Tuesday (July 14, 21, 28) morning at 10 a.m. Our first meeting will take place during the Democratic National Convention (the Republican National Convention does not take place until the end of August).
Supplies Needed: Internet Access

Title: Of Monsters and Men: Depictions of the Monstrous in Literature
Teacher: Mr. Oxford
Dates: July 13 to August 6, 2020
Time: 9-11 a.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays
Grades: 10-12
Format: Online
Register here.
Description:
In this course, we will be reading a selection of novels, short stories, and plays that unpack the question of what truly makes a monster. We will look specifically at representations of monsters in the juxtaposition of horrific outward appearances and inward malevolent intentions. The following questions will be discussed:

  • What makes a monster?
  • Is someone destined to become evil?
  • What is the role of scapegoating in the creation of monsters?
  • How can cultural bias, prejudices, and misunderstandings turn people into monsters? Can the monstrous lurk within the seemingly well-intentioned and moral?

Supplies Needed:
Frankenstein — Mary Shelley (ISBN: 1734029285)
Grendel — John Gardner (ISBN: 0679723110)
The Tempest — Shakespeare (ISBN: 0198325002)
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde — Robert Louis Stevenson (ISBN: 1505234514)

Title: Pre-Algebra Workshop
Teacher: Ms. Hannan
Dates: June 22 to July 17, 2020
Monday-Thursday
Time: 8:30-11:30 a.m.
Grades: Students rising to grades 6 and 7
Format: Online
Tuition: $650
Register here.
This math workshop is designed for students entering Pre-Algebra in the fall and will review the basic operations of arithmetic. During the first three weeks, students will be introduced to algebraic concepts and will become familiar with basic operations using integers, fractions, decimals and negative numbers. The following topics will also be covered: basics of equations, the use of variables, problem solving, factorization of numbers and properties of operation. The fourth week of the course will focus specifically on topics of review requested by the students.

Title: Remember the Ladies
Teacher: Ms. Johnston
Dates: August 3-20, 2020
Time: 1 hour, 4 days a week
Grades: 9-12
Format: Online
Register here
Abigail Adams famously wrote to her husband, John Adams while he was a delegate at the Constitutional Convention, to “remember the ladies.” When the Constitution was created, voting rights for women were not included. That changed with the ratification of the 19th amendment on August 18, 1920. This year marks the 100th anniversary of women having the right to vote. This course will look at the Suffrage Movement and the fight women endured to win their right to have a voice. Students will also analyze the impact women have had on elections since 1920.
Students enrolled in this course should expect four to six hours of work per week. Most work can be completed according to the student’s personal schedule. A live one-hour Zoom call will take place every Tuesday (August 4, 11, 18) morning at 10 a.m. Our last live meeting will coincide with the 100th anniversary of the ratification of the 19th amendment.
Supplies Needed: Internet Access

Title: SAT Math and Standardized Test Prep
Teacher: TBA
Dates: August 10-13 and August 17-20
Monday-Thursday
Time: 1-3 p.m.
Format: Online
Grades: Students entering grades 11-12
Tuition: $330
Register here.
This two-week class is designed with several goals in mind. First, students will be well informed about the structure, nature and scoring of the new SAT math and verbal tests based on the recent significant changes made to this standardized exam. After a thorough introduction, most of the sessions will be spent on analyzing and solving different types of sample math problems taken from various practice SAT tests. Additionally, this course will focus on the different approaches to problem solving, test-taking strategies, and the general navigation of standardized tests for both math and verbal sections. A portion of the class time will be spent on examining the ACT math test in identifying the similarities and differences between this test and the SAT. Individualized attention is a fundamental goal, ensuring that students completing this course will be ready to take an actual test with a set of customized strategies and a specific plan in mind.

Title: Sports and Politics
Teacher: Mr. Petito
Dates: June 29 – July 30
Time: 1 hour, 4 days a week
Grades: 9-12
Format: Online
Register here.
Sports and Politics (or society) will focus on the impact sports has played – and continues to play – in society with an emphasis on US society. This 5-week course is broken down into thematic units including: ethics in sports, discrimination in sports, business of sports, race and sports, and history of sports. Students will explore issues of race, gender, economics, and politics in relation to sports. Current topics in the news such as performance enhancing drug use, the Olympics, the scandals involving FIFA, whether college athletes should be paid, and many more will be discussed and analyzed in a respectful and engaging online community.

Title: When History and Fiction Collide: The Plot Against America
Teacher: Ms. Johnston/Ms. Levchuk
Dates: July 6-23, 2020
Time: 10-11:30 a.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays
Grades: 9-12
Format: Online
Register here.
Description:
This course will read Philip Roth’s, A Plot Against America. Simultaneously, students will learn the historical time period depicted in the book. Historical fiction combined with the study of American History will lead to the analytical question of “what if?” Through class discussions and writings, students will analyze the impact of small changes to history and the ripple effects those changes would have. The class will culminate with student presentations in which they create their own historical fiction.
Supplies Needed:
The Plot Against America by Roth (ISBN 9781400079490)

Career Series - Online

Title: Exploring the Medical Field
Teacher: Various
Dates: July 6 – July 30
Time: 1 hour, 1 day a week
Grades: 9-12
Format: Online
Register here

  • July 8, 12:30-1:30 p.m., Dr. Kathleen Cuddihy, Pediatrician
  • July 15, 4 p.m., Dr. Rajiv Verma, Cardiologist, Newark Beth Israel Hospital
  • July 22, 2-3 p.m., Dr. Teena Bhatla, Hematology/Oncology, Director of Valerie Fund Children’s Hospital of New Jersey at Newark Beth Israel Hospital
  • Week 4: Neurosurgery

Title: Exploring the Intelligence Community
Dates: July 9, July 16, July 23, July 30
Time: 1 hour, 1 day a week
Grades: 9-12
Format: Online
Register here

Week 1: July 9, 7 p.m., Hillary Peck, CIA Analyst
Week 2: July 16, 7 p.m., Michelle d’Amico, Executive Director Global Security and Intelligence at JP Morgan, formerly Analyst Defense Intelligence Agency
Week 3: July 23, 7 p.m., Marcia Williamson, FBI Special Agent
Week 4: July 30, 7 p.m., Meghann Teubner, Director of Counterterrorism NYPD

Summer Scholars Contact

Call 908-522-8186 or email debi.tarowsky@oakknoll.org with any additional questions.